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LEVOPHED
CHF and arrhythmias
Hypotension
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Drug Name:

LEVOPHED Rx

Generic Name and Formulations:
Norepinephrine bitartrate 1mg/mL (equivalent of 1mg base of norepinephrine); soln for IV infusion after dilution; contains sulfites.

Company:
Pfizer Inc.

Therapeutic Use:

Indications for LEVOPHED:

Adjunctive treatment in cardiac arrest and profound hypotension.

Adult:

Correct blood volume depletion before administration. Give by IV infusion after dilution (contains 4mcg of base/mL) into a large vein. Initially 2mL to 3mL (or 8–12mcg of base) per minute; adjust flow rate until adequate low normal BP (usually 80–100 mmHg systolic) and maintain tissue perfusion. Usual maintenance: 0.5mL to 1mL (or 2–4mcg of base) per minute. Withdraw gradually. Titrate dose based on response: see literature.

Children:

Not recommended.

Contraindications:

Hypotension due to blood volume deficits except as an emergency measure. Mesenteric or peripheral vascular thrombosis. Profound hypoxia or hypercabia. Concomitant cyclopropane and halothane anesthesia.

Warnings/Precautions:

Hypertension. Monitor BP every 2 minutes initially until desirable level is obtained, then every 5 minutes if administration is continued. Avoid extravasation. Asthma. Sulfite sensitivity. Elderly (avoid infusion into leg veins). Pregnancy (Cat. C). Nursing mothers.

Interactions:

See Contraindications. Risk of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation with cyclopropane, halothane anesthesia. Caution with MAOIs, triptyline or imipramine antidepressants; may cause prolonged hypertension.

Pharmacological Class:

Sympathomimetic.

Adverse Reactions:

Ischemic injury, reflex bradycardia, arrhythmias, anxiety, transient headache, respiratory difficulties, extravasation necrosis, volume depletion (esp. long-term use).

How Supplied:

Ampuls (4mL)—10

Indications for LEVOPHED:

To restore blood pressure control in certain acute hypotensive states (eg, pheochromocytomectomy, sympathectomy, poliomyelitis, spinal anesthesia, MI, septicemia, blood transfusion, and drug reactions).

Adult:

Correct blood volume depletion before administration. Give by IV infusion after dilution (contains 4mcg of base/mL) into a large vein. Initially 2mL to 3mL (or 8–12mcg of base) per minute; adjust flow rate until adequate low normal BP (usually 80–100 mmHg systolic) and maintain tissue perfusion. Usual maintenance: 0.5mL to 1mL (or 2–4mcg of base) per minute. Withdraw gradually. Titrate dose based on response: see literature.

Children:

Not recommended.

Contraindications:

Hypotension due to blood volume deficits except as an emergency measure. Mesenteric or peripheral vascular thrombosis. Profound hypoxia or hypercabia. Concomitant cyclopropane and halothane anesthesia.

Warnings/Precautions:

Hypertension. Monitor BP every 2 minutes initially until desirable level is obtained, then every 5 minutes if administration is continued. Avoid extravasation. Asthma. Sulfite sensitivity. Elderly (avoid infusion into leg veins). Pregnancy (Cat. C). Nursing mothers.

Interactions:

See Contraindications. Risk of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation with cyclopropane, halothane anesthesia. Caution with MAOIs, triptyline or imipramine antidepressants; may cause prolonged hypertension.

Pharmacological Class:

Sympathomimetic.

Adverse Reactions:

Ischemic injury, reflex bradycardia, arrhythmias, anxiety, transient headache, respiratory difficulties, extravasation necrosis, volume depletion (esp. long-term use).

How Supplied:

Ampuls (4mL)—10

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