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Furosemide Oral Solution
Edema
Hypertension
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Drug Name:

Furosemide Oral Solution Rx

Generic Name and Formulations:
Furosemide 10mg/mL, 40mg/5mL.

Company:
Various generic manufacturers

Therapeutic Use:

Indications for Furosemide Oral Solution:

Edema.

Adult:

Initially 20–80mg daily. May repeat or increase after 6–8 hours; max 600mg/day. Maintenance: intermittent dosing optimal.

Children:

Initially 2mg/kg. Increase if needed by 1–2mg/kg after 6–8hrs; max 6mg/kg per day. Maintenance: lowest effective dose.

Contraindications:

Anuria.

Warnings/Precautions:

Hepatic cirrhosis: do not initiate during hepatic coma or electrolyte depletion. Discontinue if increasing azotemia and oliguria occur during treatment of severe progressive renal disease. Renal or hepatic impairment. Diabetes. Gout. SLE. Sulfonamide sensitivity. Bladder emptying disorders. Prostatic hyperplasia. Urethral narrowing. Hypoproteinemia. Monitor BP, electrolytes, fluids, blood, BUN. Potassium supplementation may be needed. Premature infants and children <4yrs: risk of nephrocalcinosis/nephrolithiasis; monitor renal function. Elderly. Pregnancy (Cat.C). Nursing mothers.

Interactions:

Concomitant chloral hydrate: not recommended. Concomitant acetylsalicylic acid may reduce creatinine clearance. Digitalis, lithium, salicylate toxicity. Alcohol, CNS depressants may increase orthostatic hypotension. Severe hypotension and renal function deterioration/failure with ACEIs or ARBs; may need to interrupt or reduce dose. Antagonized by indomethacin, phenytoin. Hypokalemia with corticosteroids, ACTH, large amounts of licorice, prolonged laxatives. Increased risk of cephalosporin-induced nephrotoxicity and radiocontrast nephropathy. Increased risk of gouty arthritis and impairment of renal urate excretion with cyclosporine. Antagonizes tubocurarine, norepinephrine. Potentiates antihypertensives, succinylcholine, ganglionic or peripheral adrenergic blocking drugs. Ototoxicity with aminoglycosides, ethacrynic acid. Ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity with cisplatin (give lower doses of furosemide with positive fluid balance). Separate sucralfate dosing by at least two hours. Antagonized by, and potentiates, methotrexate and others that undergo renal tubular secretion. High doses (>80mg) may affect thyroid hormone levels. Increased BUN, serum creatinine, serum potassium levels, and weight gain may develop with NSAIDs.

See Also:

LASIX

Pharmacological Class:

Diuretic (loop).

Adverse Reactions:

Excessive diuresis, fluid or electrolyte imbalance, GI upset, dizziness, vertigo, paresthesias, orthostatic hypotension, hyperglycemia, jaundice, hyperuricemia, hypersensitivity reactions, rash, photosensitivity, tinnitus, hearing loss, blood dyscrasias, persistence of patent ductus arteriosus in premature infants.

Generic Availability:

YES

How Supplied:

Tabs 20mg—100, 1000; 40mg—100, 500, 1000; 80mg—50, 500; Oral soln—contact supplier

Indications for Furosemide Oral Solution:

Hypertension.

Adult:

Initially 40mg twice daily. Adding to other antihypertensives: initially reduce other agent's dose by 50%.

Children:

Not recommended.

Contraindications:

Anuria.

Warnings/Precautions:

Hepatic cirrhosis: do not initiate during hepatic coma or electrolyte depletion. Discontinue if increasing azotemia and oliguria occur during treatment of severe progressive renal disease. Renal or hepatic impairment. Diabetes. Gout. SLE. Sulfonamide sensitivity. Bladder emptying disorders. Prostatic hyperplasia. Urethral narrowing. Hypoproteinemia. Monitor BP, electrolytes, fluids, blood, BUN. Potassium supplementation may be needed. Premature infants and children <4yrs: risk of nephrocalcinosis/nephrolithiasis; monitor renal function. Elderly. Pregnancy (Cat.C). Nursing mothers.

Interactions:

Concomitant chloral hydrate: not recommended. Concomitant acetylsalicylic acid may reduce creatinine clearance. Digitalis, lithium, salicylate toxicity. Alcohol, CNS depressants may increase orthostatic hypotension. Severe hypotension and renal function deterioration/failure with ACEIs or ARBs; may need to interrupt or reduce dose. Antagonized by indomethacin, phenytoin. Hypokalemia with corticosteroids, ACTH, large amounts of licorice, prolonged laxatives. Increased risk of cephalosporin-induced nephrotoxicity and radiocontrast nephropathy. Increased risk of gouty arthritis and impairment of renal urate excretion with cyclosporine. Antagonizes tubocurarine, norepinephrine. Potentiates antihypertensives, succinylcholine, ganglionic or peripheral adrenergic blocking drugs. Ototoxicity with aminoglycosides, ethacrynic acid. Ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity with cisplatin (give lower doses of furosemide with positive fluid balance). Separate sucralfate dosing by at least two hours. Antagonized by, and potentiates, methotrexate and others that undergo renal tubular secretion. High doses (>80mg) may affect thyroid hormone levels. Increased BUN, serum creatinine, serum potassium levels, and weight gain may develop with NSAIDs.

See Also:

LASIX

Pharmacological Class:

Diuretic (loop).

Adverse Reactions:

Excessive diuresis, fluid or electrolyte imbalance, GI upset, dizziness, vertigo, paresthesias, orthostatic hypotension, hyperglycemia, jaundice, hyperuricemia, hypersensitivity reactions, rash, photosensitivity, tinnitus, hearing loss, blood dyscrasias, persistence of patent ductus arteriosus in premature infants.

Generic Availability:

YES

How Supplied:

Tabs 20mg—100, 1000; 40mg—100, 500, 1000; 80mg—50, 500; Oral soln—contact supplier

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