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ERBITUX
Colorectal and other GI cancers
Head and neck cancer
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Drug Name:

ERBITUX Rx

Generic Name and Formulations:
Cetuximab 100mg/vial, 200mg/vial; soln for IV infusion; preservative-free.

Company:
Lilly, Eli and Company

Therapeutic Use:

Indications for ERBITUX:

K-Ras (wild-type), EGFR-expressing metastatic colorectal cancer: for use in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin) for first-line treatment, or in combination with irinotecan (if refractory to irinotecan-based chemotherapy), or as a single agent (after failure of both irinotecan- and oxaliplatin-based regimens or if irinotecan-intolerant).

Limitations Of use:

Not indicated for Ras mutant colorectal cancer that harbor somatic mutations in exon 2 (codons 12 and 13), exon 3 (codons 59 and 61), and exon 4 (codons 117 and 146) or when Ras mutation test results are unknown.

Adult:

Confirm EGFR expression status (using FDA-approved tests) and absence of Ras mutation prior to initiation. Pretreat with H1 blocker. Give by IV infusion (use filter); max rate: 10mg/min. Initial dose: 400mg/m2 once over 2hrs; then 250mg/m2 once weekly over 1 hour until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Complete administration 1hr prior to FOLFIRI. Permanently reduce infusion rate by 50% if Grade 1 or 2 and non-serious Grade 3 infusion reaction occurs; permanently discontinue if Grade 3 or 4 serious reaction occurs. Monitor patient during and for 1hr post-infusion. Skin toxicity: see full labeling.

Children:

Not established.

Warnings/Precautions:

Monitor for serious infusion reactions; immediately interrupt and permanently discontinue if occur. Risk of cardiopulmonary arrest and/or sudden death; carefully consider use (w. irradiation or platinum-based therapy with 5-FU) in coronary artery disease, CHF, or arrhythmias. Monitor electrolytes (eg, magnesium, potassium, calcium) during and for ≥8wks after cetuximab therapy. Interrupt for acute onset or worsening pulmonary symptoms; permanently discontinue if interstitial lung disease confirmed. Monitor for dermatologic toxicities (eg, acneiform rash) and infection; avoid sun exposure. Additive cutaneous reactions with irradiation. Pregnancy (Cat.C). Nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Increased mucositis (Grade 3–4), radiation recall syndrome, acneiform rash, cardiac events, and electrolyte disturbances with radiation and cisplatin.

Pharmacological Class:

Epidermal growth factor receptor blocker.

Adverse Reactions:

Cutaneous reactions (eg, rash, pruritus, nail changes), headache, diarrhea, infection; infusion reactions (may be severe), cardiopulmonary arrest, interstitial lung disease, dermatologic toxicities, electrolyte abnormalities (eg, hypomagnesemia), sepsis, renal failure, pulmonary embolus.

Note:

Testing considerations: EGFR amplification analysis, K-RAS mutation analysis, B-RAF mutation analysis.

Generic Availability:

NO

How Supplied:

Single-use vials—1

Indications for ERBITUX:

In combination with radiation therapy for treating locally or regionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). In combination with platinum-based therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for first-line treatment of recurrent locoregional disease or metastatic SCCHN. As a single agent for recurrent or metastatic SCCHN after failure of prior platinum-based therapy.

Adult:

Pretreat with H1 blocker. Give by IV infusion (use filter); max rate: 10mg/min. Initial dose: 400mg/m2 once over 2hrs; then 250mg/m2 once weekly over 1 hour. Combination therapy: Give initial dose 1 week prior to initiation of radiation therapy. Complete administration 1 hour prior to platinum-based therapy with 5-FU. Give subsequent weekly dose for duration of radiation therapy (6–7 weeks) or until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Permanently reduce infusion rate by 50% if Grade 1 or 2 and non-serious Grade 3 infusion reaction occurs; permanently discontinue if Grade 3 or 4 serious reaction occurs. Monitor patient during and for 1hr post-infusion. Skin toxicity: see full labeling.

Children:

Not established.

Warnings/Precautions:

Monitor for serious infusion reactions; immediately interrupt and permanently discontinue if occur. Risk of cardiopulmonary arrest and/or sudden death; carefully consider use (w. irradiation or platinum-based therapy with 5-FU) in coronary artery disease, CHF, or arrhythmias. Monitor electrolytes (eg, magnesium, potassium, calcium) during and for ≥8wks after cetuximab therapy. Interrupt for acute onset or worsening pulmonary symptoms; permanently discontinue if interstitial lung disease confirmed. Monitor for dermatologic toxicities (eg, acneiform rash) and infection; avoid sun exposure. Additive cutaneous reactions with irradiation. Pregnancy (Cat.C). Nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Increased mucositis (Grade 3–4), radiation recall syndrome, acneiform rash, cardiac events, and electrolyte disturbances with radiation and cisplatin.

Pharmacological Class:

Epidermal growth factor receptor blocker.

Adverse Reactions:

Cutaneous reactions (eg, rash, pruritus, nail changes), headache, diarrhea, infection; infusion reactions (may be severe), cardiopulmonary arrest, interstitial lung disease, dermatologic toxicities, electrolyte abnormalities (eg, hypomagnesemia), sepsis, renal failure, pulmonary embolus.

Generic Availability:

NO

How Supplied:

Single-use vials—1

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