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Diazepam Injection
Addiction/dependence
Anxiety/OCD
Muscle spasms
Seizure disorders
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Drug Name:

Diazepam Injection CIV

Generic Name and Formulations:
Diazepam 5mg/mL; soln for IM or IV use; contains propylene glycol 40%, ethyl and benzyl alcohol.

Company:
Various generic manufacturers

Therapeutic Use:

Indications for Diazepam Injection:

Acute alcohol withdrawal.

Adult:

Initially 10mg IM or IV, then 5–10mg in 3–4hrs as needed. Do not use small vein.

Children:

Not established.

Contraindications:

Children <6months. Myasthenia gravis. Severe respiratory insufficiency. Severe hepatic insufficiency. Sleep apnea syndrome. Acute narrow-angle glaucoma. Untreated open angle glaucoma.

Warnings/Precautions:

Risks from concomitant use with opioids; see Interactions. Monitor for CNS depressant effects. Discontinue if paradoxical reaction occurs. Respiratory insufficiency. Depression. Suicidal tendencies. Drug or alcohol abuse. May increase severity of seizures. Renal or hepatic impairment. Avoid abrupt cessation. Reevaluate periodically. Monitor blood counts, liver function. Inj: not for use in shock, coma, acute alcohol intoxication, or obstetrical conditions. Elderly. Debilitated. Labor & delivery. Psychosis, pregnancy, nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Increased sedation, respiratory depression, coma, and death with concomitant opioids; reserve use in those for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate; if needed, limit dosages/durations to minimum and monitor. Potentiates CNS depression with alcohol, other CNS depressants (eg, phenothiazines, antipsychotics, anxiolytics/sedatives, hypnotics, anticonvulsants, narcotic analgesics, anesthetics, antihistamines, barbiturates, MAOIs, other antidepressants). Potentiated by CYP3A or CYP2C19 inhibitors (eg, cimetidine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, ketoconazole, omeprazole). May affect or be affected by phenytoin.

See Also:

VALIUM

Pharmacological Class:

Benzodiazepine.

Adverse Reactions:

Drowsiness, fatigue, muscle weakness, ataxia, CNS effects, GI disturbances, hypotension, salivation changes, neutropenia, jaundice; paradoxical excitement. Inj: apnea, cardiac arrest, venous thrombosis, phlebitis, local irritation, swelling, tonic status epilepticus (when treating petit mal), propylene glycol toxicity.

How Supplied:

Tabs 2mg—100; Tabs 5mg, 10mg—100, 500; Vials (10mL)—contact supplier

Indications for Diazepam Injection:

Anxiety.

Adult:

Moderate: 2–5mg. Severe: 5–10mg. Both deep IM or slow IV (5mg/min). May repeat in 3–4 hours. Do not use small vein.

Children:

Not recommended.

Contraindications:

Children <6months. Myasthenia gravis. Severe respiratory insufficiency. Severe hepatic insufficiency. Sleep apnea syndrome. Acute narrow-angle glaucoma. Untreated open angle glaucoma.

Warnings/Precautions:

Risks from concomitant use with opioids; see Interactions. Monitor for CNS depressant effects. Discontinue if paradoxical reaction occurs. Respiratory insufficiency. Depression. Suicidal tendencies. Drug or alcohol abuse. May increase severity of seizures. Renal or hepatic impairment. Avoid abrupt cessation. Reevaluate periodically. Monitor blood counts, liver function. Inj: not for use in shock, coma, acute alcohol intoxication, or obstetrical conditions. Elderly. Debilitated. Labor & delivery. Psychosis, pregnancy, nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Increased sedation, respiratory depression, coma, and death with concomitant opioids; reserve use in those for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate; if needed, limit dosages/durations to minimum and monitor. Potentiates CNS depression with alcohol, other CNS depressants (eg, phenothiazines, antipsychotics, anxiolytics/sedatives, hypnotics, anticonvulsants, narcotic analgesics, anesthetics, antihistamines, barbiturates, MAOIs, other antidepressants). Potentiated by CYP3A or CYP2C19 inhibitors (eg, cimetidine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, ketoconazole, omeprazole). May affect or be affected by phenytoin.

See Also:

VALIUM

Pharmacological Class:

Benzodiazepine.

Adverse Reactions:

Drowsiness, fatigue, muscle weakness, ataxia, CNS effects, GI disturbances, hypotension, salivation changes, neutropenia, jaundice; paradoxical excitement. Inj: apnea, cardiac arrest, venous thrombosis, phlebitis, local irritation, swelling, tonic status epilepticus (when treating petit mal), propylene glycol toxicity.

How Supplied:

Tabs 2mg—100; Tabs 5mg, 10mg—100, 500; Vials (10mL)—contact supplier

Indications for Diazepam Injection:

Skeletal muscle spasm.

Adult:

Initially 5–10mg slow IV (5mg/min) or IM. May repeat after 3–4hrs. Tetanus: may need larger dose. Do not use small vein.

Children:

Max 0.25mg/kg over 3 minutes; if no response after 3rd dose consider adjunctive therapy. Tetanus: age <30 days: not recommended. 30 days–5yrs: 1–2mg IM or slow IV. >5yrs: 5–10mg IM or slow IV. Both: may repeat after 3–4hrs. Do not use small vein.

Contraindications:

Children <6months. Myasthenia gravis. Severe respiratory insufficiency. Severe hepatic insufficiency. Sleep apnea syndrome. Acute narrow-angle glaucoma. Untreated open angle glaucoma.

Warnings/Precautions:

Risks from concomitant use with opioids; see Interactions. Monitor for CNS depressant effects. Discontinue if paradoxical reaction occurs. Respiratory insufficiency. Depression. Suicidal tendencies. Drug or alcohol abuse. May increase severity of seizures. Renal or hepatic impairment. Avoid abrupt cessation. Reevaluate periodically. Monitor blood counts, liver function. Inj: not for use in shock, coma, acute alcohol intoxication, or obstetrical conditions. Elderly. Debilitated. Labor & delivery. Psychosis, pregnancy, nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Increased sedation, respiratory depression, coma, and death with concomitant opioids; reserve use in those for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate; if needed, limit dosages/durations to minimum and monitor. Potentiates CNS depression with alcohol, other CNS depressants (eg, phenothiazines, antipsychotics, anxiolytics/sedatives, hypnotics, anticonvulsants, narcotic analgesics, anesthetics, antihistamines, barbiturates, MAOIs, other antidepressants). Potentiated by CYP3A or CYP2C19 inhibitors (eg, cimetidine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, ketoconazole, omeprazole). May affect or be affected by phenytoin.

See Also:

VALIUM

Pharmacological Class:

Benzodiazepine.

Adverse Reactions:

Drowsiness, fatigue, muscle weakness, ataxia, CNS effects, GI disturbances, hypotension, salivation changes, neutropenia, jaundice; paradoxical excitement. Inj: apnea, cardiac arrest, venous thrombosis, phlebitis, local irritation, swelling, tonic status epilepticus (when treating petit mal), propylene glycol toxicity.

How Supplied:

Tabs 2mg—100; Tabs 5mg, 10mg—100, 500; Vials (10mL)—contact supplier

Indications for Diazepam Injection:

Adjunct in status epilepticus and recurrent seizures.

Adult:

Initially 5–10mg slow IV (5mg/min). May repeat every 10–15 minutes; max 30mg. Repeat in 2–4 hours if needed. Do not dilute. May give IM if IV impossible. Do not use small vein.

Children:

Max 0.25mg/kg over 3 minutes; if no response after 3rd dose consider adjunctive therapy. Age <30 days: not recommended. 30 days–5yrs: 0.2–0.5mg slow IV every 2–5 minutes; max 5mg. >5yrs: 1mg slow IV every 2–5 minutes; max 10mg. Repeat in 2–4 hours if needed. Do not use small vein.

Contraindications:

Children <6months. Myasthenia gravis. Severe respiratory insufficiency. Severe hepatic insufficiency. Sleep apnea syndrome. Acute narrow-angle glaucoma. Untreated open angle glaucoma.

Warnings/Precautions:

Risks from concomitant use with opioids; see Interactions. Monitor for CNS depressant effects. Discontinue if paradoxical reaction occurs. Respiratory insufficiency. Depression. Suicidal tendencies. Drug or alcohol abuse. May increase severity of seizures. Renal or hepatic impairment. Avoid abrupt cessation. Reevaluate periodically. Monitor blood counts, liver function. Inj: not for use in shock, coma, acute alcohol intoxication, or obstetrical conditions. Elderly. Debilitated. Labor & delivery. Psychosis, pregnancy, nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Increased sedation, respiratory depression, coma, and death with concomitant opioids; reserve use in those for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate; if needed, limit dosages/durations to minimum and monitor. Potentiates CNS depression with alcohol, other CNS depressants (eg, phenothiazines, antipsychotics, anxiolytics/sedatives, hypnotics, anticonvulsants, narcotic analgesics, anesthetics, antihistamines, barbiturates, MAOIs, other antidepressants). Potentiated by CYP3A or CYP2C19 inhibitors (eg, cimetidine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, ketoconazole, omeprazole). May affect or be affected by phenytoin.

See Also:

VALIUM

Pharmacological Class:

Benzodiazepine.

Adverse Reactions:

Drowsiness, fatigue, muscle weakness, ataxia, CNS effects, GI disturbances, hypotension, salivation changes, neutropenia, jaundice; paradoxical excitement. Inj: apnea, cardiac arrest, venous thrombosis, phlebitis, local irritation, swelling, tonic status epilepticus (when treating petit mal), propylene glycol toxicity.

How Supplied:

Tabs 2mg—100; Tabs 5mg, 10mg—100, 500; Vials (10mL)—contact supplier

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