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CYTOXAN INJECTION
Breast cancer
CNS cancers
Eye cancer
Gynecologic cancers
Leukemias, lymphomas, and other hematologic cancers
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Drug Name:

CYTOXAN INJECTION Rx

Generic Name and Formulations:
Cyclophosphamide 500mg, 1g, 2g; per vial; pwd for inj after reconstitution; preservative-free.

Company:
Bristol-Myers Squibb

Therapeutic Use:

Indications for CYTOXAN INJECTION:

Carcinoma of the breast.

Adult:

Initially 40–50mg/kg IV in divided doses over 2–5 days; or 10–15mg/kg IV every 7–10 days; or 3–5mg/kg IV twice weekly.

Children:

See literature.

Contraindications:

Severe bone marrow depression.

Warnings/Precautions:

Leukopenia. Thrombocytopenia. Tumor cell infiltration of bone marrow. Previous X-ray therapy or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Impaired renal or hepatic function. Infections. Adrenalectomy. General anesthesia within 10 days of therapy. Monitor hematologic profile (esp. neutrophils and platelets). Obtain urine sample (monitor for hemorrhagic cystitis); maintain adequate hydration. May interfere with wound healing. Elderly. Pregnancy (Cat.D). Nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Potentiated by phenobarbital. Potentiates other myelosuppressives, radiotherapy, succinylcholine. May potentiate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

See Also:

Cyclophosphamide

Pharmacological Class:

Alkylating agent.

Adverse Reactions:

GI upset, alopecia, leukopenia, infections, thrombocytopenia, anemia, hemorrhagic cystitis (discontinue if occurs), renal tubular necrosis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, gonadal toxicity (amenorrhea, infertility), anaphylactic reactions.

Note:

Tabs formerly known under the brand name Cytoxan.

How Supplied:

Tabs—contact supplier
Single-use vial—1

Indications for CYTOXAN INJECTION:

Neuroblastoma (disseminated disease).

Adult:

Initially 40–50mg/kg IV in divided doses over 2–5 days; or 10–15mg/kg IV every 7–10 days; or 3–5mg/kg IV twice weekly.

Children:

See literature.

Contraindications:

Severe bone marrow depression.

Warnings/Precautions:

Leukopenia. Thrombocytopenia. Tumor cell infiltration of bone marrow. Previous X-ray therapy or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Impaired renal or hepatic function. Infections. Adrenalectomy. General anesthesia within 10 days of therapy. Monitor hematologic profile (esp. neutrophils and platelets). Obtain urine sample (monitor for hemorrhagic cystitis); maintain adequate hydration. May interfere with wound healing. Elderly. Pregnancy (Cat.D). Nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Potentiated by phenobarbital. Potentiates other myelosuppressives, radiotherapy, succinylcholine. May potentiate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

See Also:

Cyclophosphamide

Pharmacological Class:

Alkylating agent.

Adverse Reactions:

GI upset, alopecia, leukopenia, infections, thrombocytopenia, anemia, hemorrhagic cystitis (discontinue if occurs), renal tubular necrosis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, gonadal toxicity (amenorrhea, infertility), anaphylactic reactions.

Note:

Tabs formerly known under the brand name Cytoxan.

How Supplied:

Tabs—contact supplier
Single-use vial—1

Indications for CYTOXAN INJECTION:

Retinoblastoma.

Adult:

Initially 40–50mg/kg IV in divided doses over 2–5 days; or 10–15mg/kg IV every 7–10 days; or 3–5mg/kg IV twice weekly.

Children:

See literature.

Contraindications:

Severe bone marrow depression.

Warnings/Precautions:

Leukopenia. Thrombocytopenia. Tumor cell infiltration of bone marrow. Previous X-ray therapy or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Impaired renal or hepatic function. Infections. Adrenalectomy. General anesthesia within 10 days of therapy. Monitor hematologic profile (esp. neutrophils and platelets). Obtain urine sample (monitor for hemorrhagic cystitis); maintain adequate hydration. May interfere with wound healing. Elderly. Pregnancy (Cat.D). Nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Potentiated by phenobarbital. Potentiates other myelosuppressives, radiotherapy, succinylcholine. May potentiate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

See Also:

Cyclophosphamide

Pharmacological Class:

Alkylating agent.

Adverse Reactions:

GI upset, alopecia, leukopenia, infections, thrombocytopenia, anemia, hemorrhagic cystitis (discontinue if occurs), renal tubular necrosis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, gonadal toxicity (amenorrhea, infertility), anaphylactic reactions.

Note:

Tabs formerly known under the brand name Cytoxan.

How Supplied:

Tabs—contact supplier
Single-use vial—1

Indications for CYTOXAN INJECTION:

Adenocarcinoma of the ovary.

Adult:

Initially 40–50mg/kg IV in divided doses over 2–5 days; or 10–15mg/kg IV every 7–10 days; or 3–5mg/kg IV twice weekly.

Children:

See literature.

Contraindications:

Severe bone marrow depression.

Warnings/Precautions:

Leukopenia. Thrombocytopenia. Tumor cell infiltration of bone marrow. Previous X-ray therapy or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Impaired renal or hepatic function. Infections. Adrenalectomy. General anesthesia within 10 days of therapy. Monitor hematologic profile (esp. neutrophils and platelets). Obtain urine sample (monitor for hemorrhagic cystitis); maintain adequate hydration. May interfere with wound healing. Elderly. Pregnancy (Cat.D). Nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Potentiated by phenobarbital. Potentiates other myelosuppressives, radiotherapy, succinylcholine. May potentiate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

See Also:

Cyclophosphamide

Pharmacological Class:

Alkylating agent.

Adverse Reactions:

GI upset, alopecia, leukopenia, infections, thrombocytopenia, anemia, hemorrhagic cystitis (discontinue if occurs), renal tubular necrosis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, gonadal toxicity (amenorrhea, infertility), anaphylactic reactions.

Note:

Tabs formerly known under the brand name Cytoxan.

How Supplied:

Tabs—contact supplier
Single-use vial—1

Indications for CYTOXAN INJECTION:

Malignant lymphomas (Stages III and IV of the Ann Arbor staging system), Hodgkin's disease, lymphocytic lymphoma (nodular or diffuse), mixed-cell type lymphoma, histiocytic lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma. Multiple myeloma. Leukemias: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic granulocytic leukemia (it is usually ineffective in acute blastic crisis), acute myelogenous and monocytic leukemia, acute lymphoblastic (stem-cell) leukemia in children (cyclophosphamide given during remission is effective in prolonging its duration). Mycosis fungoides (advanced disease).

Adult:

Initially 40–50mg/kg IV in divided doses over 2–5 days; or 10–15mg/kg IV every 7–10 days; or 3–5mg/kg IV twice weekly.

Children:

See literature.

Contraindications:

Severe bone marrow depression.

Warnings/Precautions:

Leukopenia. Thrombocytopenia. Tumor cell infiltration of bone marrow. Previous X-ray therapy or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Impaired renal or hepatic function. Infections. Adrenalectomy. General anesthesia within 10 days of therapy. Monitor hematologic profile (esp. neutrophils and platelets). Obtain urine sample (monitor for hemorrhagic cystitis); maintain adequate hydration. May interfere with wound healing. Elderly. Pregnancy (Cat.D). Nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Potentiated by phenobarbital. Potentiates other myelosuppressives, radiotherapy, succinylcholine. May potentiate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

See Also:

Cyclophosphamide

Pharmacological Class:

Alkylating agent.

Adverse Reactions:

GI upset, alopecia, leukopenia, infections, thrombocytopenia, anemia, hemorrhagic cystitis (discontinue if occurs), renal tubular necrosis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, gonadal toxicity (amenorrhea, infertility), anaphylactic reactions.

Note:

Tabs formerly known under the brand name Cytoxan.

How Supplied:

Tabs—contact supplier
Single-use vial—1

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