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CYRAMZA
Colorectal and other GI cancers
Respiratory and thoracic cancers
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Drug Name:

CYRAMZA Rx

Generic Name and Formulations:
Ramucirumab 10mg/mL; per vial; soln for IV infusion after dilution; preservative-free.

Company:
Lilly, Eli and Company

Therapeutic Use:

Indications for CYRAMZA:

As a single agent, or in combination with paclitaxel, for treatment of advanced or metastatic, gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma with disease progression on or after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy. In combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil), for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine.

Adult:

Give by IV infusion over 60 mins. Premedicate with IV histamine H1-antagonist (eg, diphenhydramine) prior to each infusion; or with dexamethasone and acetaminophen in those who have experienced Grade 1 or 2 infusion reaction. Gastric cancer: 8mg/kg every 2 weeks. When given in combination: administer prior to paclitaxel. mCRC: 8mg/kg every 2 weeks prior to FOLFIRI. Continue until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Dose modifications: see full labeling.

Children:

Not established.

Warnings/Precautions:

Increased risk of hemorrhage; permanently discontinue if severe bleeding occurs. Control hypertension prior to initiating. Monitor blood pressure every 2 weeks or more frequently as indicated; if severe hypertension develops, temporarily suspend until medically controlled. Monitor for infusion-related reactions during therapy. Have emergency resuscitative equipment available. Permanently discontinue if severe arterial thromboembolic events, severe uncontrolled hypertension (despite antihypertensives), hypertensive crisis or encephalopathy, Grade 3 or 4 infusion-related reactions, urine protein >3g/24hrs, nephrotic syndrome, or GI perforation occurs. Impaired wound healing: withhold Cyramza prior to surgery; resume based on adequate healing; discontinue if complications develops during therapy until wound is fully healed. Clinical deterioration in patients with Child-Pugh B or C cirrhosis (eg, new or worsening encephalopathy, ascites, hepatorenal syndrome). Discontinue if reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome develops. Monitor proteinuria by urine dipstick and/or urinary protein creatinine ratio. Monitor thyroid function. Pregnancy: avoid. Use effective contraception during therapy and for ≥3 months after last ramucirumab dose. Nursing mothers: not recommended.

Pharmacological Class:

Human IgG1 monoclonal antibody.

Adverse Reactions:

Hypertension, diarrhea, headache, fatigue, asthenia, hyponatremia, anemia, intestinal obstruction, neutropenia, epistaxis, stomatitis/mucosal inflammation, rash, decreased appetite; arterial thromboembolic events, proteinuria, GI perforation, infusion-related reactions.

How Supplied:

Single-dose vial (10mL, 50mL)—1

Indications for CYRAMZA:

In combination with docetaxel, for treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy; patients with EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations should have disease progression on FDA-approved therapy for these aberrations prior to initiation.

Adult:

Give by IV infusion over 60 mins. Premedicate with IV histamine H1-antagonist (eg, diphenhydramine) prior to each infusion; or with dexamethasone and acetaminophen in those who have experienced Grade 1 or 2 infusion reaction. 10mg/kg on Day 1 of a 21-day cycle prior to docetaxel; continue until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Dose modifications: see full labeling.

Children:

Not established.

Warnings/Precautions:

Increased risk of hemorrhage; permanently discontinue if severe bleeding occurs. Control hypertension prior to initiating. Monitor blood pressure every 2 weeks or more frequently as indicated; if severe hypertension develops, temporarily suspend until medically controlled. Monitor for infusion-related reactions during therapy. Have emergency resuscitative equipment available. Permanently discontinue if severe arterial thromboembolic events, severe uncontrolled hypertension (despite antihypertensives), hypertensive crisis or encephalopathy, Grade 3 or 4 infusion-related reactions, urine protein >3g/24hrs, nephrotic syndrome, or GI perforation occurs. Impaired wound healing: withhold Cyramza prior to surgery; resume based on adequate healing; discontinue if complications develops during therapy until wound is fully healed. Clinical deterioration in patients with Child-Pugh B or C cirrhosis (eg, new or worsening encephalopathy, ascites, hepatorenal syndrome). Discontinue if reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome develops. Monitor proteinuria by urine dipstick and/or urinary protein creatinine ratio. Monitor thyroid function. Pregnancy: avoid. Use effective contraception during therapy and for ≥3 months after last ramucirumab dose. Nursing mothers: not recommended.

Pharmacological Class:

Human IgG1 monoclonal antibody.

Adverse Reactions:

Hypertension, diarrhea, headache, fatigue, asthenia, hyponatremia, anemia, intestinal obstruction, neutropenia, epistaxis, stomatitis/mucosal inflammation, rash, decreased appetite; arterial thromboembolic events, proteinuria, GI perforation, infusion-related reactions.

How Supplied:

Single-dose vial (10mL, 50mL)—1

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