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ACTIQ
Narcotic analgesics
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Drug Name:

ACTIQ CII

Generic Name and Formulations:
Fentanyl (as citrate) 200mcg, 400mcg, 600mcg, 800mcg, 1200mcg, 1600mcg; units for oral transmucosal administration; berry-flavored.

Company:
Cephalon, Inc.

Therapeutic Use:

Indications for ACTIQ:

Breakthrough pain, in opioid-tolerant patients already receiving and who are tolerant to continuous opioid therapy for underlying persistent cancer pain. Opioid-tolerant patients are those taking oral morphine ≥60mg/day, transdermal fentanyl ≥25mcg/hr, oral oxycodone ≥30mg/day, oral hydromorphone ≥8mg/day, oral oxymorphone ≥25mg/day, oral hydrocodone ≥60mg/day, or equianalgesic dose of another opioid for ≥1 week.

Adult:

Do not substitute with other fentanyl products; not equivalent to other fentanyl products on a mcg to mcg basis. Use lowest effective dose for shortest duration. ≥16yrs: Place unit between cheek and lower gum, occasionally switching sides. Suck (do not chew) over 15 mins; if excessive opioid effects occur, remove unit and reduce next dose. Initially one 200mcg unit. Titrate, evaluating dose over several episodes of pain, until a single unit provides adequate analgesia. If re-dosing for one pain episode is needed, start second unit 15 mins after first unit is finished; max 2 units/episode. Wait at least 4hrs before treating another episode. Prescribe 6 units during titration. After a successful dose is determined: max 4 units/day. Concomitant use or discontinuation of CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers: monitor closely and consider dose adjustments (see full labeling).

Children:

<16yrs: not established.

Contraindications:

Opioid non-tolerant patients. Significant respiratory depression. Acute or post-op pain (including headache/migraine, dental pain, or ER). Acute or severe bronchial asthma in an unmonitored setting or in the absence of resuscitative equipment. Known or suspected GI obstruction, including paralytic ileus.

Warnings/Precautions:

Life-threatening respiratory depression; monitor within first 24–72hrs of initiating therapy and following dose increases. Accidental exposure may cause fatal overdose (esp. in children). COPD, cor pulmonale, decreased respiratory reserve, hypoxia, hypercapnia, or pre-existing respiratory depression; monitor and consider non-opioid analgesics. Abuse potential (monitor). Adrenal insufficiency. Head injury. Increased intracranial pressure, brain tumors; monitor. Seizure disorders. CNS depression. Impaired consciousness, coma, shock; avoid. Biliary tract disease. Acute pancreatitis. Bradyarrhythmias. Drug abusers. Renal or hepatic impairment. Reevaluate periodically. Avoid abrupt cessation. Elderly. Cachectic. Debilitated. Pregnancy; potential neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome during prolonged use. Labor & delivery, nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Increased risk of hypotension, respiratory depression, sedation with benzodiazepines or other CNS depressants (eg, non-benzodiazepine sedatives/hypnotics, anxiolytics, general anesthetics, phenothiazines, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antipsychotics, alcohol, other opioids); reserve concomitant use in those for whom alternative options are inadequate; limit dosages/durations to minimum required; monitor. During or within 14 days of MAOIs: not recommended. Risk of serotonin syndrome with serotonergic drugs (eg, SSRIs, SNRIs, TCAs, triptans, 5-HT3 antagonists, mirtazapine, trazodone, tramadol, MAOIs, linezolid, IV methylene blue); monitor and discontinue if suspected. Avoid concomitant mixed agonist/antagonist opioids (eg, butorphanol, nalbuphine, pentazocine) or partial agonist (eg, buprenorphine); may reduce effects and precipitate withdrawal symptoms. Potentiated by CYP3A4 inhibitors (eg, macrolides, azole antifungals, protease inhibitors, grapefruit juice). Antagonized by CYP3A4 inducers (eg, rifampin, carbamazepine, phenytoin). May antagonize diuretics; monitor. Paralytic ileus may occur with anticholinergics.

Pharmacological Class:

Opioid agonist.

Adverse Reactions:

Nausea, dizziness, somnolence, vomiting, asthenia, headache, dyspnea, constipation, anxiety, confusion, depression, rash, insomnia; respiratory depression, severe hypotension, syncope.

Note:

Available by restricted distribution program. Call (866) 822-1483 or visit www.tirfremsaccess.com to enroll.

REMS:

YES

Generic Availability:

YES

How Supplied:

Lozenge units—30

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