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ACTICLATE
Acne
Bacterial infections
Malaria
Protozoal infections
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Drug Name:

ACTICLATE Rx

Generic Name and Formulations:
Doxycycline (as hyclate) 75mg, 150mg+; tabs; +scored; contains sodium.

Company:
Aqua Pharmaceuticals

Therapeutic Use:

Indications for ACTICLATE:

Adjunct in severe acne.

Adult:

Take with fluids; may give with food or milk if gastric irritation occurs. 200mg for 1 day (100mg every 12 hours), then 100mg daily (as a single dose or 50mg every 12 hours); if severe infections: 100mg every 12 hours.

Children:

≤8yrs: not recommended. >8yrs (≤45kg): 4.4mg/kg in 2 divided doses for 1 day, then 2.2mg/kg daily (as a single dose or divided as 2 doses); if severe infections: max 4.4mg/kg; (≥45kg): use Adults dose.

Warnings/Precautions:

Monitor blood, renal, and hepatic function in long-term use. Avoid sun or UV light. Discontinue if skin erythema or superinfection develops. Overweight women. History of intracranial hypertension. Monitor for visual disturbances. Pregnancy (Cat.D), nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Antacids containing aluminum, calcium, magnesium, bismuth subsalicylate, and iron reduce absorption. Avoid concomitant penicillins, methoxyflurane, isotretinoin. Barbiturates, carbamazepine, phenytoin may decrease effectiveness. Monitor prothrombin time with anticoagulants; may require reduced anticoagulant dose. Oral contraceptives may be less effective. May interfere with fluorescence test.

Pharmacological Class:

Tetracycline antibiotic.

Adverse Reactions:

Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, photosensitivity, urticaria, hemolytic anemia; teeth discoloration, intracranial hypertension, C.difficile-associated diarrhea.

How Supplied:

Tabs—60

Indications for ACTICLATE:

Tetracycline-susceptible infections including respiratory, genitourinary, rickettsial, trachoma. Anthrax, including inhalational anthrax (postexposure). Alternative for selected infections when penicillin is contraindicated.

Adult:

Take with fluids; may give with food or milk if gastric irritation occurs. 200mg for 1 day (100mg every 12 hours), then 100mg daily (as a single dose or 50mg every 12 hours); if severe infections (eg, chronic UTI): 100mg every 12 hours. Streptococcal infections: treat for 10 days. Uncomplicated urethral, endocervical, rectal infection, or nongonococcal urethritis (NGU): 100mg twice daily for 7 days. Uncomplicated gonococcal infections (except anorectal infections in men): 100mg twice daily for 7 days or 300mg single dose followed by a second 300mg dose 1 hr later. Syphilis (early): 100mg twice daily for 2 weeks; if >1yr duration: treat for 4 weeks. Acute epididymo-orchitis: 100mg twice daily for at least 10 days. Anthrax: 100mg twice daily for 60 days.

Children:

≤8yrs: not recommended. >8yrs (≤45kg): 4.4mg/kg in 2 divided doses for 1 day, then 2.2mg/kg daily (as a single dose or divided as 2 doses); if severe infections: max 4.4mg/kg; (≥45kg): use Adults dose. Anthrax: <45kg: 2.2mg/kg twice daily for 60 days; ≥45kg: use Adults dose.

Warnings/Precautions:

Monitor blood, renal, and hepatic function in long-term use. Avoid sun or UV light. Discontinue if skin erythema or superinfection develops. Overweight women. History of intracranial hypertension. Monitor for visual disturbances. Pregnancy (Cat.D), nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Antacids containing aluminum, calcium, magnesium, bismuth subsalicylate, and iron reduce absorption. Avoid concomitant penicillins, methoxyflurane, isotretinoin. Barbiturates, carbamazepine, phenytoin may decrease effectiveness. Monitor prothrombin time with anticoagulants; may require reduced anticoagulant dose. Oral contraceptives may be less effective. May interfere with fluorescence test.

Pharmacological Class:

Tetracycline antibiotic.

Adverse Reactions:

Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, photosensitivity, urticaria, hemolytic anemia; teeth discoloration, intracranial hypertension, C.difficile-associated diarrhea.

How Supplied:

Tabs—60

Indications for ACTICLATE:

Short term prophylaxis of P. falciparum.

Adult:

Take with fluids; may give with food or milk if gastric irritation occurs. 100mg daily; begin 1–2 days before, continue during and 4 weeks after travel to malarious area.

Children:

≤8yrs: not recommended. >8yrs: 2mg/kg daily; begin 1–2 days before, continue during and 4 weeks after travel to malarious area.

Warnings/Precautions:

Monitor blood, renal, and hepatic function in long-term use. Avoid sun or UV light. Discontinue if skin erythema or superinfection develops. Overweight women. History of intracranial hypertension. Monitor for visual disturbances. Pregnancy (Cat.D), nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Antacids containing aluminum, calcium, magnesium, bismuth subsalicylate, and iron reduce absorption. Avoid concomitant penicillins, methoxyflurane, isotretinoin. Barbiturates, carbamazepine, phenytoin may decrease effectiveness. Monitor prothrombin time with anticoagulants; may require reduced anticoagulant dose. Oral contraceptives may be less effective. May interfere with fluorescence test.

Pharmacological Class:

Tetracycline antibiotic.

Adverse Reactions:

Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, photosensitivity, urticaria, hemolytic anemia; teeth discoloration, intracranial hypertension, C.difficile-associated diarrhea.

How Supplied:

Tabs—60

Indications for ACTICLATE:

Adjunct in acute intestinal amebiasis.

Adult:

Take with fluids; may give with food or milk if gastric irritation occurs. 200mg for 1 day (100mg every 12 hours), then 100mg daily (as a single dose or 50mg every 12 hours); if severe infections: 100mg every 12 hours.

Children:

≤8yrs: not recommended. >8yrs (≤45kg): 4.4mg/kg in 2 divided doses for 1 day, then 2.2mg/kg daily (as a single dose or divided as 2 doses); if severe infections: max 4.4mg/kg; (≥45kg): use Adults dose.

Warnings/Precautions:

Monitor blood, renal, and hepatic function in long-term use. Avoid sun or UV light. Discontinue if skin erythema or superinfection develops. Overweight women. History of intracranial hypertension. Monitor for visual disturbances. Pregnancy (Cat.D), nursing mothers: not recommended.

Interactions:

Antacids containing aluminum, calcium, magnesium, bismuth subsalicylate, and iron reduce absorption. Avoid concomitant penicillins, methoxyflurane, isotretinoin. Barbiturates, carbamazepine, phenytoin may decrease effectiveness. Monitor prothrombin time with anticoagulants; may require reduced anticoagulant dose. Oral contraceptives may be less effective. May interfere with fluorescence test.

Pharmacological Class:

Tetracycline antibiotic.

Adverse Reactions:

Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, photosensitivity, urticaria, hemolytic anemia; teeth discoloration, intracranial hypertension, C.difficile-associated diarrhea.

How Supplied:

Tabs—60

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